Santa Cruz, CA
831.421.9291
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  Portland, OR
503.227.5979
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pads during constClient: USFS- Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit

Waterways, in coordination with the USFS Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) and Swanson Hydrology, has developed designs to restore the mainstem and tributaries of Cold Creek in the High Meadow Complex (HMC) near South Lake Tahoe, California. The basic restoration objective is to increase soil moisture within approximately 70 acres of meadow area by modifying the morphology and hydrology of the streams in a manner consistent with natural geomorphic processes. Work involves re-constructing approximately 8,700 linear feet of channel and raising the elevation of the streambeds by 2 to 4 feet. The project will significantly increase the diversity and density of meadow wetland vegetation species and shift some areas from seasonally dry and sparse mesic meadows to wet meadow conditions.

The project’s three-year construction plan was completed in 2012, with Waterways providing on-site construction observation.

photo coldstream webClient: Truckee River Watershed Council & California State Parks

A 2007 geomorphic assessment of the Coldstream Canyon watershed identified opportunities to restore stream and watershed function along the lower one-half mile of Cold Creek, extending upstream from the confluence with Donner Creek. Waterways, in coordination with River Run Consulting, prepared final designs for the restoration of this reach.  Designs included inset floodplain bench excavation, re-contouring of steep banks and log/boulder barb installations to reduce bank erosion and expand and improve riparian habitat.  Waterways and River Run also provided permit support and construction oversight.

landfilla panClient: City of Watsonville

Waterways staff developed a restoration plan for an area in the Watsonville Slough near Ramsay Park. Initial assessment of the Project Area identified an old landfill adjacent to Ramsay Park as a high priority site to develop plans for restoration project implementation. The Ramsay Park site was part of a larger restoration planning process that identified and prioritized a range of sites in the area (including the landfill site) A complete restoration plan for the Ramsay Park was developed to a level for project implementation. This included a hydrologic and ecologic assessment, a biotic report, wetland delineation, engineering plans, and a design report. The design aimed to create a wetland setting with irregular shorelines, suitable vegetation and natural wetland features that would serve to restore and enhance wildlife habitat and wetland functions on site.

geyer fullview webClient: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways was retained by the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County (RCD) to prepare a sediment source analysis and action plan for the recently acquired Geyer Quarry property. The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County purchased the property in 2008 to provide protection to a portion of the unique and delicate Sandhill ecosystem that extends from Bonny Doon through the Scotts Valley area of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mining activity, road construction, logging, and off‐highway vehicle (OHV) use have exposed steep, denuded hillslopes in many locations throughout the parcel. These sources of erosion have caused excessive sediment delivery to the San Lorenzo River and its key tributaries (in this case Bean Creek and Zayante Creek) resulting in impacts to salmonid habitat.

syar1 aerialClient: Syar Industries, Inc.

GEOMORPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE MIDDLE REACH OF THE RUSSIAN RIVER
Waterways, in cooperation with Swanson Hydrology and Geomorphology, is in the process of completing a detailed hydraulic, geomorphic and sediment transport analyses for the Russian River’s Middle Reach, near Healdsburg. This work focuses on the effects of in-stream mining and other human activities on channel morphology and flood capacity. A chrono-sequence of topographic surfaces representing the channel and floodplain were analyzed to calculate volumetric changes in channel geometry over the past 20 years. Then, a hydraulic model was constructed along 5 miles of the Russian River to evaluate land use impacts on flood elevations.

sycamorecreek 3Client: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways provided geomorphic assessment, land surveying, and engineering design services for ecological enhancements to a degraded reach of Sycamore Creek, at the confluence with Uvas Creek. The design included recontouring channel banks and the creation of inset floodplain benches to reduce erosion. Native vegetation was established on graded areas. Hydraulic control structures installed at the project included periodic boulder weirs and stilling pools for energy dissipation and a sheetpile cutoff at the project terminus. The detailed grading plan allowed for the retention of mature riparian trees within the project footprint.