Santa Cruz, CA
831.421.9291
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  Portland, OR
503.227.5979
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cor2 postClient: Santa Cruz County Resource Conservation District

Waterways staff prepared engineering plans and specifications for stabilization of approximately 100 linear feet of stream bank on Corralitos Creek in Santa Cruz County, California. The bioengineered bank stabilization included fabric encapsulated soil lifts contained within a log revetment structure. Logs were selectively harvested by thinning redwoods from an adjacent grove, thus reducing the cost and environmental impact of the project. Our staff performed construction supervision to ensure successful implementation. Revegetation has been successful and the bank now provides quality habitat in addition to controlling bank erosion and sedimentation in the creek.

hope survey053 webClient: American Rivers, Inc. & Placer County Resource Conservation District

Waterways was selected to develop and analyze alternatives for ecological restoration of the Hope Valley Meadow on the West Fork Carson River, with a primary goal of enhancing the full range of ecosystem services this highly visible and well-known meadow provides.

sycamorecreek 3Client: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways provided geomorphic assessment, land surveying, and engineering design services for ecological enhancements to a degraded reach of Sycamore Creek, at the confluence with Uvas Creek. The design included recontouring channel banks and the creation of inset floodplain benches to reduce erosion. Native vegetation was established on graded areas. Hydraulic control structures installed at the project included periodic boulder weirs and stilling pools for energy dissipation and a sheetpile cutoff at the project terminus. The detailed grading plan allowed for the retention of mature riparian trees within the project footprint.

manabe-2009Client: City of Watsonville

Waterways staff, with assistance from Biotic Resources Group, designed a wetland restoration project on the Manabe property in Watsonville. The project site included a 25-acre portion of Watsonville Slough, between Highway 1 and Kearney Road located downstream of a large wetland complex adjacent to Ramsey Park that was recently restored in 2005 by the City of Watsonville. The objectives of the project included:

post trail webClient:City of Watsonville

The CARE project includes an ADA compliant pedestrian and bicycle trail providing community access to through a riparian corridor along the Pajaro River, near its outlet to the Pacific. The trail was designed with a surface that could be easily maintained following periodic inundation and fine sediment deposition within the floodplain through which it traverses. The trail provides an outlet to a scenic overlook on the Pajaro River, as well as to a boat launching ramp.

pads during constClient: USFS- Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit

Waterways, in coordination with the USFS Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) and Swanson Hydrology, has developed designs to restore the mainstem and tributaries of Cold Creek in the High Meadow Complex (HMC) near South Lake Tahoe, California. The basic restoration objective is to increase soil moisture within approximately 70 acres of meadow area by modifying the morphology and hydrology of the streams in a manner consistent with natural geomorphic processes. Work involves re-constructing approximately 8,700 linear feet of channel and raising the elevation of the streambeds by 2 to 4 feet. The project will significantly increase the diversity and density of meadow wetland vegetation species and shift some areas from seasonally dry and sparse mesic meadows to wet meadow conditions.

The project’s three-year construction plan was completed in 2012, with Waterways providing on-site supervision.

09 019 P5020060 webNorth Fork John Day Watershed Council

Fox Creek has been identified as an important spawning and rearing tributary to the North Fork of the John Day River in Eastern Oregon.  Impacts to the stream and watershed include fish passage barriers associated with passive diversion structures, water withdrawals during the critical low flow summer season, lack of adequate fish screening at water diversion sites, and severe channel incision that was causing reductions in water quality associated with bank erosion and loss of a continuous riparian canopy, loss of functional floodplain habitat, and conversion of productive hay fields to marginal rangeland as water tables declined.  These changes were having a noticeable impact on the economic viability of the land and the sustainability of natural ecological processes.

valencia2-postClient: Santa Cruz County Community Action Board

Waterways staff was retained to develop a fish passage improvement design for a concrete culvert that was hindering fish passage on Valencia Creek, in Santa Cruz County. Plans were developed to construct a concrete fish ladder structure, per design criteria established by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG).

wes2 RCClient: Clackamas County, Water Environment Services

Since 2009, Waterways staff has worked with Clackamas County’s Water Environment Services (WES) on Action Planning and Geomorphic Monitoring efforts in the more urbanized portions of Clackamas County. In 2008 and 2009, Waterways was an integral member of a team of consultants that prepared Watershed Action Plans (WAP) for the Kellogg/Mt. Scott and Rock Creek watersheds. Waterways prepared the hydrologic and geomorphic sections of the Action Plan for each basin and assisted in the development of a subwatershed-scale risk assessment, identification of project priorities, and a tool-based identification of levels of service.

10 023 reder rdClient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers via HDR, Inc.

Dairy Creek is located approximately 12 miles northwest of Portland, Oregon on Sauvie Island. Dairy Creek is a highly modified channel connecting the Columbia River at river mile (RM) 98.5 to Sturgeon Lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), along with local partners, West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District (WMSWCD) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are interested in evaluating restoration opportunities for Dairy Creek (Sauvie Island) via the Section 1135 of the 2000 Water Resources Development Act. The original intent of the Dairy Creek Restoration Feasibility Study (Study) was to evaluate alternatives to re-establish Dairy Creek as a flushing channel for Sturgeon Lake.

PostConstruction web

Client: Monument Soil and Water Conservation District

Cottonwood Creek is a major tributary to the North Fork John Day River and has been identified as critical habitat for Middle Columbia River steelhead. The lower four miles of the creek enters a broad valley, providing opportunities for agriculture that relies on the water of Cottonwood Creek for production. There are currently 12 diversion sites along lower Cottonwood Creek, referred to as points of diversion (POD’s). Many of these diversions result in fish passage barriers during the low flow season. The Monument Soil and Water Conservation district requested Waterways assistance in the assessment of channel stability and fish passage for all 12 PODs and designs for three of the known fish passage barriers.

 

2013 09 20 13 45 42 webClient: Oregon Parks and Recreation

Waterways Consulting recently completed a restoration plan for Jackson and Netarts Creeks for Oregon Parks and Recreation District at Cape Lookout State Park.  The focus of the effort was to evaluate the hydrology, geomorphology, and habitat conditions of Jackson Creek, the principle stream that flows through Cape Lookout.  Approximately 60 years ago, a portion of Jackson Creek was diverted to Netarts Bay to increase freshwater flows into Netarts Bay with the hope of improving the commercial oyster beds.  Impacts associated with the diversion and associated flow split were addressed in the restoration plan as well as opportunities for enhancement of the Jackson Creek mainstem downstream of the diversion site. 

revegClient: City of San Jose

Waterways staff was retained to assess existing conditions and provide recommendations for enhancement of riparian and aquatic habitat along 2.5 miles of stream channel within Alum Rock Park, in the City of San Jose. The assessment identified Quail Hollow as a high priority project site based on fish passage impediments, stream channel erosion, and recreational access concerns.

photo coldstream webClient: Truckee River Watershed Council & California State Parks

A 2007 geomorphic assessment of the Coldstream Canyon watershed identified opportunities to restore stream and watershed function along the lower one-half mile of Cold Creek, extending upstream from the confluence with Donner Creek. Waterways, in coordination with River Run Consulting, prepared final designs for the restoration of this reach.  Designs included inset floodplain bench excavation, re-contouring of steep banks and log/boulder barb installations to reduce bank erosion and expand and improve riparian habitat.  Waterways and River Run also provided permit support and construction oversight.

postClient: Tualatin River Watershed Council

Waterways staff prepared engineering designs and specifications to improve passage for steelhead and cutthroat trout on a headwater tributary to the Tualatin River in Washington County, OR. The site consisted of a seasonal flashboard dam. Downstream of the flashboard dam the channel had incised 3-feet creating a fish passage barrier under most flow conditions. The design consists of a series of five rock weirs to build the bed up downstream of the structure and provide fish passage under all flow conditions by creating a backwater condition at the dam. Waterways assisted the TRWC with the permitting and construction supervision. The project was constructed in Summer 2008.

logs constClient: Tualatin River Watershed Council (TRWC)

In March of 2003 the TRWC completed work on the Lower Gales Creek Habitat Enhancement Plan. Gales Creek is a major tributary to the Tualatin River in Washington County, Oregon. The Enhancement Plan identified potential restoration projects designed to improve habitat conditions for steelhead and other salmonids. To evaluate the feasibility of implementing potential channel, floodplain, and habitat enhancement projects, TRWC retained the services of Waterways staff to conduct a comprehensive geomorphic assessment of the planning reach and prioritize potential restoration options. The geomorphic assessment and project feasibility study was completed in 2005. Following completion of the study, Waterways has continued to work with the TRWC by preparing construction documents for site specific projects aimed at enhancing channel and floodplain function, improving in-stream and off-channel aquatic and wetland habitat, and restoring riparian areas. Waterways and TRWC has worked closely with landowners and other stakeholders to achieve the identified goals.

PA210029webClient: Necanicum River Watershed Council


Waterways was hired to develop an engineered solution to address a high priority fish passage site on the South Fork Necanicum.  The project site consists of a 6-foot high diversion dam and intake structure.  The objectives of the project were to provide unimpeded passage for all species and life histories of salmonids present in the South Fork, meet NMFS and NOAA Fisheries fish screening guidelines, and provide a reliable source of water to the City of Seaside according to their existing water right.  Specific project tasks include preparing a set of alternatives for review by a technical advisory team, preparation of preliminary engineering drawings for the selected alternative, preparation of a water management plan that identifies potential changes in the operation and management of the diversion as a result of the modifications, and preparation of the final engineering drawings. 

P7210026webClient: Yamhill Basin Council


Gooseneck Creek, tributary to Mill Creek and the South Yamhill River, is an important tributary for steelhead/coho salmon spawning and rearing. The project area is located above the confluence with Mill Creek in a portion of the channel that was historically impacted by aggregate mining. Waterways was contracted by the Greater Yamhill Basin Council to develop a restoration design for approximately 2,000 feet of Gooseneck Creek that was incised down to bedrock due to past mining activities and historic plugging of a secondary channel. Confinement of the channel, in-channel mining activities, and loss of secondary channels had all but eliminated the natural pool-riffle morphology with a consequent loss of aquatic and riparian habitat.

slr-weirClient: County of Santa Cruz Department of Environmental Health

The objectives of this project were to develop a comprehensive plan that identified, through focused research and analysis of existing data, the limiting factors affecting habitat and populations conditions on the San Lorenzo River for steelhead trout and coho salmon. The San Lorenzo River is noted as having the largest run of steelhead south of San Francisco Bay and historically supported populations of coho.

downstream end of culvert 271Client: Scappoose Bay Watershed Council

Waterways was retained by the Scappoose Bay Watershed Council to develop bid-ready engineering drawings for six culverts on Salmon and Cox Creeks in the Scappoose Bay Watershed that were identified as high priority fish passage barriers during an assessment conducted in 2001.  The design approach consisted of replacing each culvert with a bottomless arch culvert using streambed simulation criteria established by NOAA Fisheries and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

syar1 aerialClient: Syar Industries, Inc.

GEOMORPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE MIDDLE REACH OF THE RUSSIAN RIVER
Waterways, in cooperation with Swanson Hydrology and Geomorphology, is in the process of completing a detailed hydraulic, geomorphic and sediment transport analyses for the Russian River’s Middle Reach, near Healdsburg. This work focuses on the effects of in-stream mining and other human activities on channel morphology and flood capacity. A chrono-sequence of topographic surfaces representing the channel and floodplain were analyzed to calculate volumetric changes in channel geometry over the past 20 years. Then, a hydraulic model was constructed along 5 miles of the Russian River to evaluate land use impacts on flood elevations.

landfilla panClient: City of Watsonville

Waterways staff developed a restoration plan for an area in the Watsonville Slough near Ramsay Park. Initial assessment of the Project Area identified an old landfill adjacent to Ramsay Park as a high priority site to develop plans for restoration project implementation. The Ramsay Park site was part of a larger restoration planning process that identified and prioritized a range of sites in the area (including the landfill site) A complete restoration plan for the Ramsay Park was developed to a level for project implementation. This included a hydrologic and ecologic assessment, a biotic report, wetland delineation, engineering plans, and a design report. The design aimed to create a wetland setting with irregular shorelines, suitable vegetation and natural wetland features that would serve to restore and enhance wildlife habitat and wetland functions on site.

0506 108 webClient: California State Parks- Diablo Vista District

The Mitchell Creek Riparian Restoration and Fish Passage Improvement Project provides for removal of four small dams and the decommissioning of defunct access roads along a reach of Mitchell Creek, within Mount Diablo State Park. The design includes approximately 400 feet of constructed roughened channel to provide fish passage through the grade transition created by the various impoundments. In addition to the fish passage improvements, the project removed approximately 2,500 cubic yards of impounded sediments from upstream of the site to restore floodplain function and reduce local bank erosion. The design included the installation of large wood elements obtained on site to provide bank stability and enhanced pool development.

geyer fullview webClient: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways was retained by the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County (RCD) to prepare a sediment source analysis and action plan for the recently acquired Geyer Quarry property. The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County purchased the property in 2008 to provide protection to a portion of the unique and delicate Sandhill ecosystem that extends from Bonny Doon through the Scotts Valley area of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mining activity, road construction, logging, and off‐highway vehicle (OHV) use have exposed steep, denuded hillslopes in many locations throughout the parcel. These sources of erosion have caused excessive sediment delivery to the San Lorenzo River and its key tributaries (in this case Bean Creek and Zayante Creek) resulting in impacts to salmonid habitat.

restored channel webClient: United States Forest Service

The Cookhouse Meadow Restoration Project replaced approximately 1600 linear of stream that had incised by 4-6 feet within a meadow setting.  The new channel was anticipated to restore a more natural channel morphology and flooding and soil moisture regime throughout the meadow, which is in turn expected to lead to improvements in water quality, vegetation composition, and fish and wildlife habitat.  The project used stacked sod, salvaged from distributed areas throughout the adjacent meadow, to construct stable banks that will allow for natural channel evolution and adjustment.  

edgewood1Client: Vail Resorts

Heavenly Mountain Resort in the Lake Tahoe Basin is in the process of updated their Master Plan (MP 05). One component of the update includes identification of potential restoration projects in the Edgewood Creek watershed to improve Stream Environment Zone health and improve water quality.Waterways staff was retained to prepare the Edgewood Watershed Assessment and Enhancement Plan (EWAEP) for the portion of the watershed managed by Heavenly Mountain Resort and to design and implement priority restoration projects identified as part of the assessment. The final EWAEP was submitted in January 2006 and was followed by four restoration designs completed in 2006.

fishladderClient: Boy Scouts of America, Monterey Bay Area Council

The Boy Scouts of America own and operate an 800-acre property on the Little Sur River that is used as a summer camp. A flashboard dam was installed in the 1950s to create an impoundment for recreational and educational uses. The seasonal operation of this dam impeded juvenile and adult steelhead passage at the site

20130521 180504Client: Town of Truckee

The Town of Truckee has partnered with the Truckee River Watershed Council and Truckee Development Corporation in a multi-objective redevelopment project that seeks to revitalize the downtown and the adjacent rail yard, reduce flood risks for businesses and residents, and improve the natural environment. The focus of this project is restoration of Trout Creek and development of open space that connects residents and visitors of the Truckee area to important natural resources. Waterways is leading a team of consultants tasked with enhancing habitat values and functions of Trout Creek.

woodydebris webClient: US Forest Service

Waterways staff led an interdisciplinary team to assess existing conditions within the Blackwood Creek Watershed. Blackwood Creek is a major tributary to Lake Tahoe, drains a mix of steep volcanic and granitic terrain, has a high bedload transport rate, and was historically impacted by grazing, logging, and instream gravel mining. Key impacts identified during the study were excessive bank erosion and channel widening associated with channel incision and loss of floodplain connectivity and the presence of several fish passage barriers. To restore the physical processes that sustain channel morphology and biological function, an aggressive, long-term restoration strategy was proposed.

Copy of P1010305Client: Sonoma County Public Works

Waterways assisted the Sonoma County Department of Transportation and Public Works with planning and design services to address two fish passage barriers associated with stream crossings on County roads. The sites consisted of two large concrete box culverts that were limiting fish passage to high quality spawning and rearing habitat located upstream. At each of these culverts, the natural streambed had incised to at least 4 feet below the culvert outlet, resulting in a partial barrier to migrating salmonids. The design solution included structural retrofit of the culverts using concrete baffles, and the construction of a roughened channel to aggrade the stream profile sufficiently to eliminate the passage barrier. Work consisted of topographic mapping, hydrologic and hydraulic modeling, and preparation of preliminary and final design drawings and specifications.

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Project Menu

Central California Project Portfolio
Aptos Creek Watershed Assessment and Enhancement Plan
Attiyeh Ranch Conservation Easement
Camp Pico Blanco Fish Ladder and Dam Retrofit
City of Santa Cruz Watershed Management Plan
Corralitos Creek Bank Stabilization
Eureka Canyon Bridge Replacement and Fish Passage Improvements @ Koinonia Conference Center
Fall Creek Fish Ladder
Geyer Quarry Restoration Plan
Mitchell Creek Dam Removals & Fish Passage Improvements
North Monterey County High School Nature Area Design Project
Pajaro River Care Project
Potrero Hills Wetland Mitigation
Quail Hollow Bridge Replacement and Channel Restoration
Salmonid Enhancment Plan for the San Lorenzo River
San Lorenzo River Monitoring
Soquel Creek Floodplain Restoration
Sycamore Creek Bank Stabilization
Valencia Creek Fish Ladder
Watsonville Sloughs Landfill Site Restoration near Ramsay Park
Watsonville Sloughs Manabe Property Wetland Restoration
Watsonville Trails Master Plan
West Valley College Stream and Wetland Enhancement and Riparian Trail Plan
Zayante Area Sediment Source Reduction Plan
Northern Cal-Nevada Project Portfolio
Big Meadow Creek Watershed Assessment
Blackwood Creek Stream Restoration
Cold Creek/ High Meadow Ecosystem Restoration
Coldstream Floodplain Enhancement Project
Edgewood Creek Watershed Assessment, Enhancement Plan, & Restoration
Hat Creek Restoration
Hope Valley Meadow Restoration
Independence Lake Log Cribwall and Fish Barrier Design
Kunzler Ranch Gravel Extraction
Perazzo Meadows Geomorphic Assessment
Russian River Projects
Sonoma County Fish Passage Projects
St. Helena Comprehensive Flood Protection Plan
Trout Creek Restoration
Upper Carson River Watershed Assessment
Pacific Northwest Project Portfolio
Batwater Station Floodplain Enhancement Project
Clackamas County Water Environment Services Action Planning & Geomorphic Monitoring
Dairy Creek- Sturgeon Lake Restoration
East Valley Mine Wetland Mitigation Project
Fox Creek Restoration Plan
Gales Creek Restoration Planning
Gooseneck Creek Restoration
Half Mile Lane Mitigation Bank
Hillsboro Landfill Wetlands Outfall Channel and No-Rise Documentation
Jackson Creek Restoration Plan
Lower Clatskanie Floodplain Restoration
Lower Cottonwood Creek Points of Diversion Modification Projects
Mill Creek Side Channel Restoration
Milton Creek Large Wood Enhancement Project
Murtaugh Creek Fish Passage
North Fork Deep Creek Habitat Enhancement Project
Rinearson Creek Natural Area Restoration
Salmon and Cox Creek Fish Barrier Improvement Project
Scappoose Bay Restoration Plan
South Fork Necanicum Fish Passage Improvement Project
Southern California Project Portfolio
Arroyo Grande Creek Channel Flood Mitigation
Circle G Ranch Fish Passage Improvement
Gobernador Creek Bridge Replacement and Fish Passage Improvements - Widdoes Residence
Morro Fish Review
Pismo Creek Fish Passage Project
Rodriguez Fish Passage Project
Tally Ho Channel Assessment