Santa Cruz, CA
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Central California Project Portfolio

 

Explore some of our Central California projects using the cluster map or by viewing the items below.

aptoscreekClient: Coastal Watershed Council

The primary objective of this project was to develop a watershed assessment and enhancement plan for the Aptos Creek Watershed with a focus on restoration and enhancement of salmonids spawning and rearing habitat. Aptos Creek is a small coastal drainage located in southern Santa Cruz County. A variety of land uses occur within the watershed including urban, rural residential, orchards, timber harvests, and recreation. A large portion of land is protected within the Forest of Nisene Marks, which is part of the California State Park System.

fishladderClient: Boy Scouts of America, Monterey Bay Area Council

The Boy Scouts of America own and operate an 800-acre property on the Little Sur River that is used as a summer camp. A flashboard dam was installed in the 1950s to create an impoundment for recreational and educational uses. The seasonal operation of this dam impeded juvenile and adult steelhead passage at the site

loch lomondClient: City of Santa Cruz Water Department

A management plan was developed for watershed lands owned by the City of Santa Cruz. The purpose of the plan was to outline long-term management strategies for protection of the quality and quantity of the City’s primary surface water sources. Waterways staff, in conjunction with SH+G, completed the hydrology, geomorphology and fisheries section of the report and developed an overall plan to guide future management activities on the City’s properties. Future management actions included the cessation of commercial logging, specific recommendations to reduce point sources of erosion from roads and road crossings, and a detailed map of future road management including the decommissioning of existing roads. Portions of the Plan have already been implemented by the City of Santa Cruz.

cor2 postClient: Santa Cruz County Resource Conservation District

Waterways staff prepared engineering plans and specifications for stabilization of approximately 100 linear feet of stream bank on Corralitos Creek in Santa Cruz County, California. The bioengineered bank stabilization included fabric encapsulated soil lifts contained within a log revetment structure. Logs were selectively harvested by thinning redwoods from an adjacent grove, thus reducing the cost and environmental impact of the project. Our staff performed construction supervision to ensure successful implementation. Revegetation has been successful and the bank now provides quality habitat in addition to controlling bank erosion and sedimentation in the creek.

IMG 2531webClient: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways contracted with the Santa Cruz County Resource Conservation District (SCRCD) and the State Coastal Conservancy to provide design services for the improvement of fish passage at a stream crossing along Shingle Mill Gulch. The project site had a 6-foot diameter corrugated metal pipe culvert which provided conveyance beneath a private driveway servicing the Koinonia Conference grounds. Hydraulic analyses of the culvert determined that it was undersized for design flood flows and presented a fish passage impediment to migrating salmonids.

LadderWithFlow webClient: San Lorenzo Valley Water District

Waterways supported the San Lorenzo Valley Water District by leading the design team on the Fall Creek fish ladder and diversions screening project. The project involved expanding and retrofiting the existing fish ladder and diversion intake structures to comply with current DFW and NOAA fish passage and screening standards. The ladder will serve both adult and juvenile life stages by providing dividable ladder cells. Further, the design lowers the screened intake location to reduce the height fish must pass through the structure. Phase one was constructed in 2014 and phase two in the summer of 2016.

 

geyer fullview webClient: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways was retained by the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County (RCD) to prepare a sediment source analysis and action plan for the recently acquired Geyer Quarry property. The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County purchased the property in 2008 to provide protection to a portion of the unique and delicate Sandhill ecosystem that extends from Bonny Doon through the Scotts Valley area of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mining activity, road construction, logging, and off‐highway vehicle (OHV) use have exposed steep, denuded hillslopes in many locations throughout the parcel. These sources of erosion have caused excessive sediment delivery to the San Lorenzo River and its key tributaries (in this case Bean Creek and Zayante Creek) resulting in impacts to salmonid habitat.

0506 108 webClient: California State Parks- Diablo Vista District

The Mitchell Creek Riparian Restoration and Fish Passage Improvement Project provides for removal of four small dams and the decommissioning of defunct access roads along a reach of Mitchell Creek, within Mount Diablo State Park. The design includes approximately 400 feet of constructed roughened channel to provide fish passage through the grade transition created by the various impoundments. In addition to the fish passage improvements, the project removed aproximately 2,500 cubic yards of impounded sediments from upstream of the site to restore floodplain function and reduce local bank erosion. The design included the installation of large wood elements obtained on site to provide bank stability and enhanced pool development. Waterways provided construction oversight for the project.

northmontereyClient: Resource Conservation District of Monterey County

Currently undeveloped portions of the North Monterey County High School Campus provide excellent locations for upland and wetland restoration projects that could facilitate educational opportunities.  Waterways is supporting Central Coast Wetlands group and the RCD of Monterey County by providing land surveying, preliminary design services, and permit support for proposed nature trails and wetland enhancement projects in support of Red Legged Frog and Santa Cruz Long Toed Salamanders.

 

 

post trail webClient:City of Watsonville

The CARE project includes an ADA compliant pedestrian and bicycle trail providing community access to through a riparian corridor along the Pajaro River, near its outlet to the Pacific. The trail was designed with a surface that could be easily maintained following periodic inundation and fine sediment deposition within the floodplain through which it traverses. The trail provides an outlet to a scenic overlook on the Pajaro River, as well as to a boat launching ramp.

SH7 poss loc E of SH1 webClient: Environmental Stewardship and Planning

The Potrero Hills Landfill is in the process of expanding its facilities.  The proposed landfill expansion will encompass 170 acres of land and will impact approximately 3 acres of wetland and pond habitat that serve as breeding habitat for the California Tiger Salamander (CTS).   Measures to mitigate impacts to CTS include both habitat conservation and wetland enhancements that focus on key species listed as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). 

Waterways Consulting assisted with the Watsonville Slough Restoration project that has recently been nominated as a 2013 public works project of the year.

Published in Latest News

revegClient: City of San Jose

Waterways staff was retained to assess existing conditions and provide recommendations for enhancement of riparian and aquatic habitat along 2.5 miles of stream channel within Alum Rock Park, in the City of San Jose. The assessment identified Quail Hollow as a high priority project site based on fish passage impediments, stream channel erosion, and recreational access concerns.

slr-weirClient: County of Santa Cruz Department of Environmental Health

The objectives of this project were to develop a comprehensive plan that identified, through focused research and analysis of existing data, the limiting factors affecting habitat and populations conditions on the San Lorenzo River for steelhead trout and coho salmon. The San Lorenzo River is noted as having the largest run of steelhead south of San Francisco Bay and historically supported populations of coho.

ds from courthouse ped bridge 2010 webClient: City of Santa Cruz- Public Works Department

Waterways performs annual cross section surveys at seventeen permanent monitoring sections established along the San Lorenzo River, from Highway 1 to the river mouth.   This project assists the City of Santa Cruz in meeting flood protection requirements and habitat restoration goals by quantifying changes in channel elevation, form, and vegetation cover.  The monitoring data is presented in an annual report discussing the geomorphic and hydrologic trends, and providing adaptive management recommendations to the City’s riparian vegetation and sediment management operations.

SoquelPage12 CroppedA watershed assessment prepared for the East Branch of Soquel Creek identified high sediment loads, lack of pools, low summer base flows, and high water temperatures as limiting factors for steelhead and coho production.  In 2013, the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County contracted with Waterways to prepare a feasibility analysis and engineered designs for a biomechanical bank stabilization of a large eroding cutbank and for habitat enhancements along approximately 1,500 feet of channel banks that were covered with unvegetated riprap, resulting in lack of habitat complexity or riparian cover. 

 

sycamorecreek 3Client: Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

Waterways provided geomorphic assessment, land surveying, and engineering design services for ecological enhancements to a degraded reach of Sycamore Creek, at the confluence with Uvas Creek. The design included recontouring channel banks and the creation of inset floodplain benches to reduce erosion. Native vegetation was established on graded areas. Hydraulic control structures installed at the project included periodic boulder weirs and stilling pools for energy dissipation and a sheetpile cutoff at the project terminus. The detailed grading plan allowed for the retention of mature riparian trees within the project footprint.

valencia2-postClient: Santa Cruz County Community Action Board

Waterways staff was retained to develop a fish passage improvement design for a concrete culvert that was hindering fish passage on Valencia Creek, in Santa Cruz County. Plans were developed to construct a concrete fish ladder structure, per design criteria established by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG).

landfilla panClient: City of Watsonville

Waterways staff developed a restoration plan for an area in the Watsonville Slough near Ramsay Park. Initial assessment of the Project Area identified an old landfill adjacent to Ramsay Park as a high priority site to develop plans for restoration project implementation. The Ramsay Park site was part of a larger restoration planning process that identified and prioritized a range of sites in the area (including the landfill site) A complete restoration plan for the Ramsay Park was developed to a level for project implementation. This included a hydrologic and ecologic assessment, a biotic report, wetland delineation, engineering plans, and a design report. The design aimed to create a wetland setting with irregular shorelines, suitable vegetation and natural wetland features that would serve to restore and enhance wildlife habitat and wetland functions on site.

manabe-2009Client: City of Watsonville

Several decades ago a wetland was ditched and drained to convert the historic wetland into farmland on the Manabe property in Watsonville, California. The City of Watsonville purchased the Manabe property and contracted with Waterways to design a plan for restoring the farmland back into wetland. The project successfully restored the property by:

 

 

 

  • Converting the site from a degraded wetland dominated by dry season agricultural uses to a functioning wetland system.
  • Improved wildlife function in the restored wetland by recontouring the site to create a mosaic of channels, islands, and floodplain benches revegetated with locally obtained native wetland, riparian, and upland plant species.
  • Improved Slough circulation by increasing open water habitat and connectivity between different parts of the Slough system.
  • Improved water quality in the Slough by pre-treating adjacent runoff from industrial and residential areas in a forebay and vegetated swale system.
  • Improved recreational use of the area through aesthetic improvements and construction of pedestrian pathways adjacent to the site that will connect with existing trails as recommended in the Watsonville Trails Master Plan.


trails2Client: City of Watsonville

Under Phase 1, Waterways staff designed a seven mile network of pedestrian and bicycle trails along the Watsonville Sloughs System, within the City of Watsonville. Our scope included the preparation of a Trails Master Plan, identification of opportunities and constraints, engineering feasibility assessment, hydraulic modeling, final plans and specifications, permit support, and construction monitoring. The trail designs were implemented successfully, creating public access footpaths and bicycle trails with trail segments that also provide Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant access. Design challenges included multiple slough crossings (boardwalks), retaining walls, and bridges constructed on peat soils within a complex hydrologic regime. Design of each trail segment offered opportunities for ecological restoration, including removal of exotic vegetation and re-vegetation with native communities.

For phase 2, Waterways created a Master Plan for over 25 additional miles of trails within and adjacent to the City of Watsonville. Waterways is currently preparing 100% designs for portions of the Phase 2 trails system.

 

z1Client: County of Santa Cruz

Waterways staff, in conjunction with SH+G, developed sediment load allocation and recommendations to reduce chronic fine sediment inflow as a basis for a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for the San Lorenzo River Watershed in Santa Cruz County. Work included development of a GIS database of streams, subwatershed drainage basins and road networks. Erosion rates developed for the Soquel Demonstration Forest by California Department of Forestry were adapted to the San Lorenzo River watershed to calculate sediment yields from roads and other erosion sources. The project aimed to improve impaired fisheries conditions for steelhead and coho.